Six Times You Shouldn’t Call Your Health Insurance Company

Did you know that there are times you shouldn’t call your health insurance company? Unfortunately, they can’t help you with every aspect of your health needs. As a result, you waste your time and effort asking them for help. Below are a few examples.

Don’t call when . . .

  1. You have a medical emergency. You shouldn’t call your health insurance company if you need immediate medical treatment. Instead, call 911. They are the agency that can best handle your emergency.
  2. You want info on another carrier. If you want to find out what benefits another health insurance company offers, call them directly. The friendly customer rep at your insurance company can’t quote prices or give benefits on another one. Why? They don’t have access to that information. Plus, it’s not part of his job. Think about it.
  3. You looking to sign up for COBRA. COBRA does not get notified by her your health insurance company that you quit your job and want to continue coverage through them. Your employee actually notifies them. So, if you haven’t received any information about COBRA after separating from your job, you shouldn’t call your health insurance company. You should call your old human resources representative and ask him what’s up.
  4. You need a doctor’s appointment. Need to see your doctor? Don’t call your health insurer even if you’re dealing with a catchall HMO like Group Health. In order to schedule face-time with your physician, call his office. His staff will be able to set an appointment for you.
  5. You’re not sure what you want to ask. If you have a question that you can’t articulate, don’t call your health insurance company. Calling them with vague, convoluted questions just wastes every ones time. Therefore, before you pick up the phone, write down on paper the questions you want to ask. Then call and ask them in an organized, orderly fashion.
  6. You’re trying to get medical guidance. You shouldn’t call your health insurance company if you’re ill and want a medical diagnosis or guidance. The men and women answering the phone are trained to answer these kinds of questions. All they can do is refer you to a medical professional like a doctor. Some insurance companies do have hot lines to nurses, but 9 times out of 10, they too are limited in what they can offer. So, go straight to the source. Make a doctor’s appointment or go to a walk-in for help.

 

Ready to save the dime (or quarter) you spend calling your health insurance company now? Remember these six things and that you shouldn’t call your health insurance company about them. Only dial up your health insurance company when it’s necessary like to ask about a benefit, claim or payment. Spend the rest of your time calling the appropriate party, so you can get the help you need in record time.